Visits to the website since: 6th October 2012 Website last updated: 11th December 2014

See also

Charles PENFOLD (1865-1917)

picture

Charles R PENFOLD, Charles Penfold

picture

Spouse: Mary Anna TUCKER, Mary Anna Penfold

1 Charles R PENFOLD (1865-1917) [93], son of William PENFOLD (1826-1873) [11] and Mary Ann Charlotte GUNN (1831-1886) [12].

Born 31 Oct 1865, Hartfield, Sussex, England. Marr Mary Anna TUCKER 13 Nov 1886. Died 4 Sep 1917, Streatham, London, England.

Charles was reputed to be a devoted and abstemious family man who worked as a poorly paid post office sorter and supplemented the family income by repairing footwear in the evenings, often working into the night. He liked to keep the family well fed, and did much of the shopping himself. He and his wife were highly principled, and imbued their children with a kind of Christian socialist outlook (for want of a better term) but without priggishness and, so far as I can judge, without any strong affiliation with organized religion” (Letters from Peter Reich 2000).

Charles retired from the postal service on 16th June 1916 due to ill health and died aged 51 years on the 4th

September 1917, at 12 Penrith Street, Streatham. His wife died in Somerset in 1945 aged 87. She was paralyzed

for the last 10 years of her life due to a fall.

Sp. Mary Anna TUCKER (1860-1945) [94].

I think Mary Tucker was brought up on a farm near Chard in Somerset. She told me once of trying to ride the cows, with her young playmates. Before marriage she was a travelling Companion to a wealthy(perhaps titled) lady, and spent time in continental Europe and in Ireland. Despite this, she never ventured beyond her own front gate in all the years that I knew her, when she lived in Streatham and, later Wallington, Surrey. She was very active about the house until falling on the coal cellar stairs, thereafter spending the last 10 or more years of her life semi-paralysed.

My sister Mary as a young child, and my mother(Jo) lived with Charles and Mary for several years. I never heard them talk of those days other than with deep affection for both.

[Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich - December 2000].

1.1 Thomas Edwin PENFOLD (1887-1949) [115].

Born 29 Aug 1887, Chelsea, London, England.1 Marr Agnes Monteith GOSSIP 1914, Fulham, London, England. Marr Mary Lucy STRETTON 21 Feb 1940, Nightingale Square, Balham, London, England.2 Church Of The Holy Ghost. Witness: Mildred M Collins

Witness: Mary E Collins. Died 24 Oct 1949, Hitchin, Hertfordshire, England.3

THOMAS was considered a ‘difficult’ man and did not, I felt, share in the strong mutual affinity that his four siblings enjoyed. He was more attracted to ‘authority’ than the others, and of his male brothers & in-laws, the only one to attain the rank of corporal. It is said that he rebuked his brothers and their mates, during a jollification, for behaviour unbecoming to associates of a corporal in uniform. He married Agnes Gossip, a highly nervous and gentle soul. The family was very fond of her, and often shocked by what they say as humiliating treatment she received from him. They had 2 children Charles and Joan (ca 1915 &1918) who were more of their mothers gentle disposition. In the 1930’s and early 1940’s Tom was elected as a member of Mitcham Borough Council, and enjoyed being addressed as Councillor Penfold. He served as a special Constable for part of WW2 and about this time Agnes died. After the war he had a succession of jobs as a ‘trusty’ type of housekeeper. He was a tall, rather impressive looking man, and had little difficulty of finding such work. He was remarried to a Roman Catholic, and converted to that faith. When his brother Ted heard of this from my mother (Jo) he wrote back, saying ‘so Tom’s gone over to the enemy.’ They adopted a little boy(Billie) and seemed to find suitable work as a live-in housekeeping couple.

[Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich - December 2000]

_______________________________________________________________.

Sp. Agnes Monteith GOSSIP (1889-1939) [116].

1.1.1 Charles Edwin PENFOLD (1915-1969) [148].

Born 19 Aug 1915, Fulham, Middlesex, England. Died 22 Apr 1969, Croydon, Surrey, England.

1.1.2 Joan Isabel PENFOLD (1920-1999) [149].

Born 26 Nov 1920, Fulham, London, England. Marr Anthony Jack RICKARD 1941. Died 22 Feb 1999, Eastbourne, Sussex, England.

Sp. Anthony Jack RICKARD (1921-1999) [150].

Sp. Mary Lucy STRETTON (1894-1972) [117].

1.1.3 William Patrick PENFOLD (1940-2007) [151].

Born 24 Mar 1940. Died 18 Apr 2007.

1.2 Rosalie Mary PENFOLD (1889-1957) [118].

Born 1889, Chelsea, London, England.1 Died 22 Nov 1957, Luxulyan, Cornwall, England.

ROSALIE I don't think I shall ever know anyone as unselfish and quietly capable as my Auntie Rose. She did not marry, though she'd have made a fine mother. She qualified as a school teacher and soon got a headship, all the while running a household which included her widowed mother, her youngest brother Bill and for several years my mother and her firstborn. I never saw her idle. She was of frail physique, but during WW2's blitz, she left home in the evenings to do fire watching duties alone in her large school building. During the years leading up to her retirement she lived with us at Banstead, Surrey and during that period of 2 years, helped my sister Mary run the household. She suffered from angina and acutely from arthritis and when my parents (Jo and Doug) moved to Cornwall on Dad's retirement she spent her last days there. After retiring at aged 65 she had only a short respite before suffering two massive strokes. She is buried in a tiny churchyard in Luxulyan Village, mid Cornwall. A lasting memory of her, is her way of referring to her infant pupils, whom she adored, as 'my little ones'.

[Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich - December 2000].

1.3 Mary Anna PENFOLD (1892- ) [125].

Born 1892, East Grinstead, Sussex, England.

1.4 Josephine Grace PENFOLD (1893-1976) [119].

Born 16 Oct 1893, Haywards Heath, Sussex, England. Marr Douglas Gordon REICH 1915. Died 1976, Bodmin, Cornwall, England.

JOSEPHINE GRACE As a child my mother suffered years of illness and so had little schooling. She read voraciously at home and, no doubt, also benefited from having bright siblings about her. I never found her lacking in the 3 R’s or general knowledge, but she seemed to me to worry unduly about being relatively uneducated. Her first born arrived early in WW1, and for all but a few weeks of the next years my father was away in France. She lived with her parents for much of that difficult time and both she and my sister Mary never forgot their loving kindness. For part of the war she worked in a food shop but never sought employment after my father returned. Some very lean years followed, before my father, could begin a career. Her mother was widowed, but she and my mothers’ elder sister Rosalie gave generous support. By the time I was born (1926) my parents were settled in a home of their own, a small council house in Tooting: even so my father always used to ask ‘going up home today?’, referring to her pushing the pram to her mother’s house at Streatham. The death of little Jo (from complications of measles) dealt a terrible blow from which, I feel my mother never fully recovered.

(Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich by Julie Hughes-Owen, December2000).

Sp. Douglas Gordon REICH (1893-1970) [120].

DOUGLAS GORDON REICH Like Uncle Ted, my father seems to have been the tearaway of his family, but was acknowledged to be the brightest. At 11 years, he won a scholarship to Latimer Upper School, Hamersmith, a prestigious place: one of his classmates became the Astronomer Royal( Sir Harold Spencer-Jones). When his father(William Stewart Reich) died, Dad, aged 13 was taken away from school so that he could spend more of his time in the fish and chip business his mother started up to make ends meet. (Even when still at school his early morning duty was to fetch sacks of spuds from the markets). He then got a job as Assistant Quantity Surveyor at Holloways Builders Yard, Hammersmith. 'They paid me a boys wage for a man's work' was his comment on that phase. His friendship with my mother was associated with the hospitality he used to get at her home, and he retained great affection for her parents. He joined the Territorial Army before WW1 and therefore was very soon over in France, and spent most of it at the front. Only the rare, dropped remark, pointed to the horrors, and he never talked to his children of the cruel punishment he received after an episode in mid-war: it attracted questions in parliament. His french became fluent and in 1919 he spent a year or so working for the War Graves Commission. Back in Blighty he matriculated at Birkbeck college and became a schoolmaster, content to remain so until retirement. His interests were family, garden and tennis. A nasty motor-bike accident in 1934 crippled him for life but his passion for gardening (mostly flowers) was undimmed. He liked to drink, but this caused anxiety, as he did not seem to handle a large intake very well. My mother spent most of her married life keeping his intake moderate, except for very infrequent outbursts. He was a great smoker, but this attracted little criticism from Mum, despite the crippling tax on tobacco in the U.K.

Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich.

1.5 Charles Edward Powell PENFOLD (1897-1970) [121].

Born 4 Sep 1897, Fulham, London, England. Marr Ida Mavell BURSILL 20 Apr 1932. Died 5 Oct 1970, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

CHARLES EDWARD Some seven relatives have left me with impressions of the young Ted. If asked to convey in a few words their gist, I would say ‘a highly principled, and often loveable, scallywag.’ He seems to be the most rebellious of the children. There is the occasion, during one of his fathers ‘ Sunday afternoon family readings (from one of the Socialist periodicals- perhaps ‘Tribune’) when Ted started talking. His Dad said sh, Shush and Ted replied ‘Stop playing trains with yourself.....’

He brought home an ‘unfortunate’ woman, ensconced her in the cellar and fed her for several days, before his mother discovered her.

My Dad, Doug, recalled being at a large family gathering at the Penfold house, which was about to break up late in the evening. His sympathetic eye saw, when Ted came in from a night out with the lads, that he had a heavy skinful on board, but that he conducted himself with meticulous dignity, saying that he was tired and would like to go up to bed. At that time candlelight was needed to get upstairs. He was handed a candle and carefully took matches from his pocket to light it. Unfortunately it was already lit......

His young brother Bill, gave several illustrations of his principled behaviour, one being the discovery of his illicit still in U.S.A, and how it was unthinkable that Ted would have given the Prohibition cops the bribe they were expecting and so went to jail. It seems from accounts from Bill and my mother (Jo) that he was a terrible tease, and sometimes a bit of a bully. Bill was of weaker physique than Ted, but of iron will, and issued an ultimatum that Ted ignored. Hence the bloody crowning with a soup ladle. My mother said he could be a bit of a bully: ‘get to the library Jo!’ etc. but they had a great affinity, not least in the novels they preferred, although Ted was more hooked than Jo on Jack London. As I recall, they both ‘knew their Dickens’. My mother was very distressed when Ted’s letters ceased, but already had a premonition that he had inherited his fathers’ heart weakness. (Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich by Julie Hughes-Owen, December 2000)

______________________________________________________________________.

“Ted” was born on September 4th 1897 in Fulham. It is said he was a merchant navy seaman. He moved to the USA approxiamately 1925 and mentioned to be living in New York. He mentioned that he carried a “squirt”, a concealed handgun spent time in prison for bootlegging. When things got too hot there he signed up on a ship which came to Australia. After an incident that led to the death of a cook, he jumped ship and changed his name to Ted Powell. He obtained a job in the Marble Bar area digging wells on stations and prospecting, or working on the local gold mines until he got a job in Wiluna on the gold mine there. It is here that he met Ida Bursill. Born June 2nd 1914, in Trafalga, Western Australia, Ida was the youngest child of William and Marion (Acie) Bursill. She was in Wiluna to be with her only sister Hannah whose husband, George Durant was working in the local gold mine. Ida was working at Curly O'Connor's boarding house where Ted was staying. They were married on 20th April 1932 in a civil ceremony. The Marriage Certificate was signed by Ida Bursill and Edward Powell. Ida was not aware that this was not Ted’s legal name at this time.

[FROM PENFOLD TO POWELL - THE STORY OF OUR FAMILY By Julie Hughes-Owen]

______________________________________________________________________.

Bill Powell comments on his father are 'My memories of Dad were that he was a good looking man, about five foot eight or nine, had a good physique and was a hard worker. He was also a hard drinker who loved to bet on anything that ran, galloped or trotted. It was apparent that he had a very good education and could hold his own with any one on almost any subject being discussed, much to peoples' surprise at times. One of these being the local clergy. He would have them at ease and lulled into a false sense of security with a cuppa in hand and in a comfortable chair before he commenced to question them on their religion and shoot their views and theories down in flames. We usually only got one visit from these people. Throughout life he gave the impression he was afraid of nobody and acted accordingly.'

______________________________________________________________________.

Sp. Ida Mavell BURSILL (1914-1990) [122].

1.5.1 Peter POWELL (1934-1985) [152].

Born 4 Feb 1934, Wiluna, Western Australia, Australia. Died 20 May 1985.

_____________________________________________________________

Peter started working in the mining industry in 1951 as a Survey Chainman and Underground Miner with Great Western Consolidated (later a subsidiary company of Western Mining Corporation) at Bullfinch. From 1951 to 1967, he combined part time study at the Western Australian School Of Mines in Kalgoorlie, while working in a variety of positions at Bullfinch, Norseman and then Kalgoorlie. During this time Peter completed his Underground Supervisors Certificate, Mine Managers Certificate and 1st Class Mine Managers Certificate. In 1967, he qualified with a Diploma of Mining and from 1968 to 1971 was Production Superintendent and Production Manager at Mount Charlotte and Fimiston for Gold Mines of Kalgoorlie( Aust) Ltd. In 1971 Peter joined Western Mineral Sands Pty Ltd (which became Westralian Sands Ltd) as Production Superintendent and acted as Manager of this operation from 1973 to 1975. In 1977 he was made Operations Manager of Westralian Sands, a position he held until he died on the 20th May 1985 from an aneurysm to the brain. A mineral sands concentrator was named in his honour (Powell Concentrator).

FROM PENFOLD TO POWELL - THE STORY OF OUR FAMILY by Julie Hughes-Owen

_____________________________________________________________.

Sp. (unknown).

1.5.2 Edward John POWELL (1932-1941) [176].

Born 24 Aug 1932, Wiluna, Western Australia, Australia. Died 25 Nov 1941.

1.6 William Robert PENFOLD (1899- ) [123].

Born 1899, Fulham, London, England.1 Marr Evelyn HOLLYWELL 1942.

WILLIAM ROBERT My uncle Bill was a great ‘presence’ to my sister and I, both in childhood and later. He had a safe and comfortable job as a clerical officer in the civil service and led a sheltered life, in some respect, with his mother and sister Rosalie. He read widely and, in aesthetic matters, had tastes that at that time seemed somewhat above his station. He was a most generous uncle, his gifts always thoughtfully chosen, but could bring us up very sharply if we were over-indulgent. He and my father were of very different temperaments and abilities, but got on very well because each acknowledged the other’s field of interest. He was fastidious in dress and something of a gourmet. Perhaps he was the most highly-strung of the five. His hours of work were very ‘cushy’ before WW2 but he took his job seriously and was very jealous of the incorruptibility of the Civil Service throughout his life. Early in WW2 he had to leave home and find digs in Harrogate (Yorkshire) to work in the Ministry of Aircraft Production. His hours of work were unaccustomedly long and being of a hyper-conscientious nature he showed signs of acute stress. He found friendship there in a colleague, Evelyn Hollywell, who invited him to share her interest in the theatre and ballet (obsession might be an after word). They married and a daughter Anne was born (ca.1943). The marriage was not a success, and some members of the family, who had seen him as a perennial bachelor, were not surprised. In addition he hit his head when he fell into an unmarked hole in an urban footpath. He sought compensation from the local council in an expensive legal battle, and lost. Around this time he had a nervous breakdown, but even before that a schism was threatening, first with his sisters, and finally separation from his wife. Their daughter Anne was adored by both her parents, went to a prestigious school in London, and finally settled (not surprisingly) for a career on the stage. We went backstage when the English Shakespeare Company toured our local theatre and spoke to Anne and her husband, but it was clear that they did not want a reconnection with her father’s family. I should recall an incident shortly after WW2 that typifies the Fulham Penfold spirit. Bill was conscious of falling probity during WW2 in the Civil Service he so admired, and several fishy episodes had attracted publicity. It seems that one of his close colleagues was involved. He invited Bill to have a drink one lunchtime in a pub, and Bill said something like ‘no thanks, I don’t drink with corruption.’ It cost him his front teeth. (Transcription of Letters from Peter Reich by Julie Hughes-Owen, December 2000)

______________________________________________________________________.

Sp. Evelyn HOLLYWELL ( - ) [124].

Sources

1"Census 1911 Fulham, London, England RG14 Piece: 355 Reference: RG14PN355 RG78PN11 RD3 SD5 ED18 SN341" (RG14 Piece: 355 Reference: RG14PN355 RG78PN11 RD3 SD5 ED18 SN341).
picture

Source: Census 1911 Fulham, London, England RG14 Piece: 355 Reference: RG14PN355 RG78PN11 RD3 SD5 ED18 SN341, 1911Census-charles penfold-fulham

2"Marriage Nightingale Square, Balham, London, England (Church Of The Holy Ghost) 21 Feb 1940 Thomas Edwin PENFOLD & Mary Lucy Stretton" (222).
picture

Source: Marriage Nightingale Square, Balham, London, England (Church Of The Holy Ghost) 21 Feb 1940 Thomas Edwin PENFOLD & Mary Lucy Stretton, Tree001-W21-MC02

3"Thomas Edwin Penfold - Death Certificate".
picture

Source: Thomas Edwin Penfold - Death Certificate